Friday, 25 April 2014

Momos~Indian State Sikkim

Momos~Indian State Sikkim
Nestling as it does in the Himalayan Mountains, the state of Sikkim is characterised by mountainous terrain. Almost the entire state is hilly, with an elevation ranging from 280 metres (920 ft) to 8,586 metres (28,169 ft). The summit of Kangchenjunga—the world's third-highest peak—is the state's highest point, situated on the border between Sikkim and Nepal. For the most part, the land is unfit for agriculture because of the rocky, precipitous slopes. However, some hill slopes have been converted into terrace farms. Numerous snow-fed streams have carved out river valleys in the west and south of the state. These streams combine into the major Teesta River and its tributary, the Rangeet, which flow through the state from north to south. About a third of the state is heavily forested.

The Himalayan Mountains surround the northern, eastern and western borders of Sikkim. The Lower Himalayas, lying in the southern reaches of the state, are the most densely populated. The state has 28 mountain peaks, more than 80 glaciers, 227 high-altitude lakes (including the  Tsongmo,  Gurudongmar  and Khecheopalri Lakes, five major hot springs, and more than 100 rivers and streams. Eight mountain passes connect the state to Tibet, Bhutan and Nepal.


Sikkim's hot springs are renowned for their medicinal and therapeutic values. Among the state's most notable hot springs are those at Phurchachu, Yumthang, Borang, Ralang, Taram-chu and Yumey Samdong. The springs, which have a high sulphur content, are located near river banks; some are known to emit hydrogen. The average temperature of the water in these hot springs is 50 °C (122 °F).

So Sikkimese are essentially rice-eaters. Alcoholic drinks are popular both amongst men and women. Beef eating is common amongst the Bhutias. It is not uncommon to see Marwari plainsmen gulping down Momos and Thukpa and Bhutias partaking to Indian dishes like Puris and Dosas - a turn sign of national integration. A typical diet of a working Sikkimese consists of dal bhat (lentils and rice) with meat for breakfast, a light lunch of momos, and an early dinner consisting of noodles. ( Copied basically from Wikipedia). 

So when shall we visit Sikkim? Physically today I have taken you on a virtual tour on the Blogging Marathon day 25 where we are blogging food from Indian States. 


I had asked Chandrani Banarjee for some NE Indian dishes. I knew NE would be difficult and knowing that Chandrani is from NE was a blessing. 

She has very kindly posted these two dishes. The first being a dish that needs bhut jolokia murg I was sure none of our local chillies will do any justice to this famous dish. The second one was momos… 

This is for the second time that I have made momos this time because the girls saw the pictures and said, “ you are going to use these pictures? They are so bad! You will do a better job if you make momos again.” 

If I ask them they will still not like the pictures.  This time they want me to stem momos over tomato soup in the true Sikkim way. Maybe in the rains I will do it.
Thanks Chandrani for showing how easy it is to make momos and it need not be enjoyed only in restaurants only.
Momos~Indian State Sikkim

Momos

Indian State:Sikkim
Recipe Source:Cuisine Delights
Ingredients :
The dough :
  • 2 cups Maida/APF 
  • Water to bind the dough
  • A few drops of oil (optional)
The filling:
  • 1  Carrot  
  • ¼  cup Cabbage, grated
  • ¼   cup Cauliflower, grated
  • ¼ cup capsicum, chopped fine
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 4 cloves Garlic, finely chopped
  • ½ tsp Red chilli Powder: 
  • 1 tsp oil 

Method:
For dough :
  • Knead the flour to smooth but not sticky dough, and keep aside.
  • Smear a little oil cover it with a damp cloth set aside.

For filling:
  • Heat oil, add chopped garlic, when gives nice aroma then add veggies, and red chilli powder, fry for a minute.
  • Then add salt, mix well and leave to cool. If there is any water, drain well before using.
  •  The filling should be dry, and this is why we add salt in the end.
  • For making momos: 
  • Now that your dough and filling are both ready, it is time to shape the dumplings.
  • Roll out the dough using a cookie cutter or a katori cut it into little circles for each momo.
  • Put a tablespoon of filling in the centre of each circle and fold over into a half moon.
  •  You could dip your fingertips in water & press the edges tight & pleat the edges (like a modak) to seal. Given the number I had to make (for the announcement was this is for lunch and if any are left for tea) I just got the edges together and pressed them hard.
  • Repeat the filling process for all the circles. Keep these aside.
  • There are many, many different choices for momo shapes, and you can check the once Chandrani has shown here. I made the modak kind and the half moon kind earlier I found that it’s faster to make the modak style momos.

For steaming the Momos:
  • I do not have a steamer so I use a big vessel to boil water. My colander fits the mouth of the vessel. So this is what I use. Boil the water before transferring the momos to the colander.
  • Before you steam the momos oil the colander  lightly then  put the momos in, so they won’t stick to the metal, then place as many as you can without touching each other. 
  • Steam the momos for about 30 minutes, till they get done.
  • Serve hot with Spicy Garlic Chutney.


Momos~Indian State Sikkim






Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 39 Hi! First time here? Well then you are Most Welcome! I hope you keep coming back for more here. If you are my regular visitor then Thanks, for you encourage me to experiment more!! I would like you to please click on my link below and like my Facebook Page. I will be happy if you can follow me on on Twitter too!

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14 comments:

  1. i'd like to believe that you used both hands to hold your momo perfectly between the chopsticks, and if not i'd like to learn how you do it with 2 fingers:)...btw i loved the momos and the dish you served it and the chutney

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  2. Looks like its momos day today, you made them prefectly Archana, would love to have some rite now.

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  3. Momos everywhere. Yours look great. The garlic chutney looks yummy too!

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  4. Archana, I love these momos and you were lucky that Chandrani sent you the recipes..I too got them from a old magazine which were featuring various states. The chutney looks striking!

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  5. the last click is mind blowing.. delicious momos and chutney!!

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  6. Wow Archana, those momos have turned out so like a pro..great job and I enjoyed reading your intro!

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  7. Same pinch Archana. I made momos too and even my picky eater son loved them.

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  8. They ook awesome, Archana. I somehow missed out on momos for this region!

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  9. Another momos recipe! Love the momos and that vibrate orange red dipping sauce. Lovely dishes for the state. I am glad you found a recipe from that cookbook. :)

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  10. Tempting momos and the dipping sauce is even more inviting!!!

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  11. Oh wow irresistible momos there making me hungry now :)looks very very yummm. and the dipping sauce is just lip smacking :)

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  12. perfectly shaped momos archana.. they look so cute.. the dip is such a pretty colour

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